Gauging awareness levels of phishing emails from students at Canterbury Christ Church University and their perception of different types of phishing emails and their variants

Principal Researcher

Mr Nima Movassagh

Level of Research

Masters

Project Start Date

January 2019

Research Context

​The current thesis focuses on gauging awareness levels of phishing emails from students and their perception of different types of phishing email and their variants with the goal of comprehensively answering the following research questions:

Research Question 1: What are the underlying factors in which students fall victim to different types of phishing attacks?

Research Question 2: Does the perception of different types of phishing emails from students correspond with the statistical information in surveys and interviews?

The results of the research will be put into a bar graph or a pie chart.

Believable phishing emails and their variants, i.e. emails that trick people into believing that they are real, are one of the primary persuasive techniques used by fraudsters. The sophisticated nature of the messages sent to a victim via email can increase the chance of an individual being defrauded. Victims of online fraud tend to provide their personal and financial information to cybercriminals and individuals who want to make money illegitimately. Fraudsters use a variety of techniques to initiate phishing attacks - some of the phishing emails and their variants are email, social network, VoIP (voice phishing), SMS (smishing), malicious websites, search engines and instant messaging (Smadi, Aslam, and Zhang, 2018). Smith (2010) identified the different strategies used by fraudsters to victimise individuals from phishing emails: syntactic (technical), semantic (social engineering) and blended (both).

Research Methodology

​Questionnaires will be completed from a sample size which will include students at Canterbury Christ Church University who are studying criminology or a policing course in the Canterbury Centre for Policing Research (CCPR) department.

A combination of mixed methods approach: focus group interviews or semi-structured interviews will be used in the research.

Interim reports and publications

​Not available

Date due for completion

May 2021
Return to Research Map