Pre-arrest diversion of people with mental health issues

This systematic review was undertaken by Dr Karen Schucan Bird and colleagues at Evidence for Public Policy and Practice Information Coordinating Centre (EPPI-Centre), UCL Institute of Education, University College London.

 


Pre-arrest diversion of people with mental health issues allow police officers to use their discretion to divert individuals suspected of non-violent, low level offences away from the criminal justice system and towards mental health services. Rather than arresting people with mental health issues, officers transport or refer them to community-based facilities where they are assessed, and possibly treated, by health professionals. A range of approaches have been developed and implemented around the world including Crisis Intervention Teams, Crisis Outreach Teams and Link schemes.

This systematic review aims to use the evidence base to provide a holistic account of pre-arrest diversion of people with mental health issues. To do so, the review has two main objectives. First, the review aims to meta-analyse evidence on the effect of pre-arrest diversion strategies for crime and mental health outcomes in short and longer term. Second, the review aims to synthesise the theories underpinning the effectiveness of pre-arrest diversion, whether the intervention is likely to be more effective for particular people and the evidence around implementation and costs.   

The research protocol for this systematic review is included below. The protocol covered a broad remit and specified the methods for both a systematic map and review.

This systematic review was undertaken by Dr Karen Schucan Bird and colleagues at the Evidence for Public Policy and Practice Information Coordinating Centre (EPPI-Centre), UCL Institute of Education, University College London as part of the Commissioned Partnership Programme. It is part of a series of systematic reviews.


For more information about College What Works, email whatworks@college.pnn.police.uk‚Äč